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   Kabuki is a set of resources designed to create a hyper-linked research environment for the study of Japanese culture, kabuki theater, Japanese performance, and kinsei history. It is a kind of "dessert-first" learning resource; its purpose is to introduce students to Tokugawa culture, society, and history by centering on kabuki culture and plays. This resource, if it is used as a self-directed research environment, is appropriate for skills ranging from high schools students to advanced undergraduates. It is assumed that high school students and freshman undergraduates would primarily use the basic chapters describing the history and performance standards of kabuki, but other chapters are equally applicable. More specialized aspects of the module, such as the glossary, are more suited to advanced research on the specific topic. This module has been linked to a second module, "Tokugawa Japan," so that this module can be more effectively used to teach Japanese history.

   The module is designed to support multiple objectives, but its principle object is teaching how to negotiate a resource-rich environment to solve interpretive problems. The key objective is the learning of research, focussed reading, and applied knowledge; the module has also been designed as a resource-rich environment to allow for a diversity of viewpoints and approaches to a specific problem. In the pilot implementation, the students are required to see Akira Kurosawa's film, Ran , and explain the film either using the performance traditions (and the meaning of those traditions) or the thematics of kabuki theater, or other aspects of Tokugawa culture (hence the link to the Tokugawa Japan module). They are then to share and develop their answers collaboratively on a page designed for interactive and collaborative research and interpretation.

   Students are expected to assess other student answers by developing their research or insights; in the pilot implementation, full assessment is done solely by the instructor. In future implementations, the students will be expected to participate in grading and assessment and integrating that assessment into their own research and interpretation. This module has already been implemented in a scaled-down form; the purpose was to test the basic information and the soundness of the student work approach. The module will be fully developed as concerns content by May 30; future implementation is uncertain.