tsurane
   Kabuki theater has a number of formal spoken conventions, or kata, that characterize every performance. Perhaps the most popular convention is tsurane, which is an extended declamatory speech delivered by a major character. This speech can be delivered on the main stage, but is usually delivered on the shichisan, the "seven-three," which is the position on the hanimichi seven-tenths of the way towards the stage. This is the portion of the stage where major characters always pause for it is the most critical part of an actor's performance; shichisan acting is the audience's first introduction to the actor performing the role. So most tsurane occur during an actor's entrance (de) at the "seven-three" position. Often, to call attention to both the entrance kata and the forthcoming tsurane , a character on stage will announce the entrance of the character (yobi) by pointing to the end of the hanimichi and announcing a character's impending arrival. Tsurane in early kabuki were most often improvise speeches (sutizerifu), but now the tsurane of classical kabuki are fixed and traditional. Tsurane is delivered in a musical voice; the elocution of tsurane is grand.